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Eastern European Stamps of Women

Dear Friends and Philatelists,
Summertime is a traditional time for taking a family holiday or perhaps visiting another country or city. The summer of 2020 finds many of us not currently able to do this given these challenging times.  It is, however, an opportune time to reconnect with our stamp collections and continue our philatelic travels, perhaps to new countries or with new topics or themes. And of course, we can continue to connect with family and friends, if even at a distance. Now is certainly time to pay tribute to our many brave front-line workers.

Monarchs, Saints, Performers, & Scientists and Social Activists

Eastern European Stamps of Women span a wide range of topics, from monarchs to saints and scientists, artists and performers, to social activists and heroines. The Hungaria Stamp Exchange hopes you enjoy reading our blog post and viewing some of the stamps in our on-line store.

Monarchs

Two of the most influential female Eastern European monarchs whose combined reigns lasted almost 75 years were Catherine the Great of Russia and Maria Teresa, ruling the Hapsburg Empire. Both of these extraordinary rulers are depicted on Eastern European stamps.   

Catherine the Great   (born Sophie of Anhalt-Zerbst;  May 1729 –November 1796) was Empress of Russia from 1762 until 1796 and the country’s longest-ruling female leader. She came to power following a coup d’état that she organized, resulting in her husband, Peter III, being overthrown. During her reign Russia was revitalized; it grew larger and stronger and was recognized as one of the great powers of Europe and Asia.

In her accession to power and her rule of the empire, Catherine often relied on her noble favorites, most notably count Grigory Orlov and Grigory Potemkin. Assisted by highly successful generals such as Alexander Suvorov  and admirals such as Fyodor Ushakov, she governed at a time when the Russian Empire was expanding rapidly by conquest and diplomacy. In the south, the Crimean Khanate was crushed following victories over the Ottoman Empire in the Russo-Turkish wars. Russia colonized the territories of Novorossiya along the coasts of the Black and Azov Seas. In the west, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, ruled by Catherine’s former lover, King Stanisław August Poniatowski, was eventually partitioned with the Russian Empire gaining the largest share. In the east, Russia started to colonize Alaska, establishing Russian America.

An admirer of Peter the Great, Catherine continued to modernize Russia along Western European lines. The economy and military conscription continued to depend on serfdom; increasing demands of the state and of private landowners intensified the exploitation of serf labor. This was one of the chief reasons inciting several rebellions including the large scale Pugachev Rebellion of Cossacks and peasants. Cossacks were a group of Russian military warriors who established free self-governing communities in exchange for their military service. When their privileges were threatened they revolted, with the most famous being Pugachev.

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Postal Heroes – HSE Spring 2020 Newsletter

Dear Philatelic Friends and Collectors,

Here at the Hungaria Stamp Exchange we hope you are staying safely at home able to enjoy family and friends (even if only remotely) and spend time enjoying your stamp collection which may offer interesting views of far off cultures and geographies.

During these extremely challenging times when many of us may be homebound or not engaging in many journeys, we hope you will enjoy reading about the many connections near and far made by the post in various locations, countries, and geographies around the world. Also please join us in honoring and celebrating the many front line heroes helping us everyday: the medical providers and first responders, food producers and the postal workers.

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April 2020

Dear Philatelic Friends and Colleagues,

As the world around us turns inward to protect itself during this pandemic, our thoughts here at the Hungaria Stamp Exchange are with you and your families. Our thoughts and wishes are for your good health and safety. 

We are here by phone and email to answer any philatelic questions you may have during this time, although our traditional mail response may take longer than usual as we all slow down our travel to and from the postal authorities.

Sincerely,

The Bauer Family 

Welcome, 2020!

Dear Philatelic friends and colleagues,

We at the Hungaria Stamp Exchange hope you are enjoying the start of the 2020 New year! Here at the Hungaria Stamp Exchange we are delighted to greet many of our long-time customers and welcome newly acquainted collectors and supporters of philately. We thank you all at the start of the year for your continued support and business.

Before you completely turn the page to the next decade we hope  that you can take a few minutes to join us in a review of both the exciting and magnificent postal offerings of the last decade and a look at what the closing of the decade means for HSE.

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Budapest Au Revoir: Hungaria Stamp Exchange Retrospective

Bela Bauer in Budapest

Today, Alan is looking at cabinet drawings for the new Hungaria Stamp Exchange library which is currently under construction and planning for its opening Fall 2018. It becomes apparent it is now time to reflect on how did this little stamp trading club comprised of Budapest friends come this far? A brief journey back in time to Budapest in the late 1920’s finds Béla Bauer, Alan’s father, trading Hungarian postal stamps with members of his close circle of friends in Budapest. At that time, while not studying for dental school, Béla’s other hobbies include writing music and trips with friends to Lake Balaton.

Hungarian FDC sent to
Sec. Béla Bauer in NYC

Béla Bauer married and moved to the United States in the early 1940’s. He arrived in New York City to start his new dental laboratory and get his family settled into his newfound homeland. He soon joined a local stamp club, Hungarian Philatelic Society, and filled the role of the secretary of the organization.

Once Béla and his family moved from New York City to central New York State, he started a small part-time stamp business called the Hungaria Stamp Exchange, focusing primarily on Hungarian stamps and some Hungarian postal history.

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